Modo 10 on the move

A month ago, I had a fun adventure taking a train across Canada (which I can highly recommend, by the way).

I’ve moved from Toronto to Vancouver, so I’ve been sans PC for a few months.

Never fear, though, I could still run Modo on my trusty Surface Pro 1 🙂

TrainModo2

One of the stops along the way was in Winnipeg.
I had two tasks while there, getting some t-shirts, and finding something to model in Modo (well ok, three, if you include a milkshake at VJ’s).

I decided on this auto-sprinkler thing:

PhotoRef

The plan was to do most of the modelling work with standard Pixar sub-d stuff in Modo 901 while on the train.

After I arrived in Vancouver, though, I upgraded to Modo 10, which gave me some fun new tools to play with!

Procedural Text

Non destructive modelling along the lines of Max’s stack, and/or Maya’s history is something that has been discussed a long time in Modo circles, and it has landed in Modo 10!

So, once the main mesh was finished, I could select an edge loop in the sub-d mesh, use Edges to Curves to create a curve to place the text around.

Then, in a new procedural text item, I reference in the curve, and use it with a Path generator and a path segment generator to wrap the text around the sprinkler base plate:

TextProcedural

I couldn’t work out a procedural way to get those letters rotated correctly, so I just fixed that up manually afterwards.

Fusey fuse

Since I wanted the text to be extruded from the surface and to look like it is all one piece, I decided to use Modo’s Mesh Fusion to Boolean the text on:

FoundryFusion

Since the mesh was a sub-d mesh, I didn’t really need to make a low poly, I just used the cage.
Well… Technically I should probably still make a low poly (the cage is 3500 vertices, which is pretty heavy), but it’s amazing what you can get away with these days, and soon we will have edge weighted sub-d in all major engines anyway (we won’t… But if I say it enough times, maybe it will happen??):

LowPoly.png

At this point, I unwrapped the cage, to get the thing ready for texturing.

Substance Painter time

I won’t go too much into the process here, because my approach is generally along the lines of: stack up dozens of procedural layers, and mess about with numbers for a few hours…

Since I could not be bothered rendering out a Surface ID map from Modo, I quickly created some base folders with masks created from the UV Chunk Fill mode in the Polygon Fill tool.

So in about 10 minutes I had a base set of folders to work with, and some materials applied:

UnwrapDone.png

Hello weird bronze liney thing.
Looks like someone forgot to generate world space normal maps…

Anyway, I went with a fairly standard corroded bronze material for the main body, and tweaked it a little.
Then added a bunch more procedural layers, occasionally adding paint masks to break them up here and there when I didn’t feel like adding too many more procedural controls.

There’s about 30 layers all in all, some on pretty low opacity:

SubstanceLayers.png

And here’s what I ended up with in Painter:

SubstancePassDone

Pretty happy with that 🙂
Could do with some more saturation variation on the pink bits, and the dirt and wear is a bit heavy, but near enough is good enough!

Giant hover sprinkler of doom

And here it is in UE4, really large, and floating in the air, and with a lower resolution texture on it (because 2048 is super greedy :P):

UE4

Speaking of UE4: Modo 10 has materials that are compatible with the base materials in Unreal and Unity now, so you can have assets look almost identical between the two bits of software.

Which is pretty neat. I haven’t played with that feature, but I feel like it will be particularly nice for game artists who want to take Unreal assets into Modo, and render them out for folio pieces, etc.

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One Response to “Modo 10 on the move”

  1. City Scanner | Geoff Lester's Blog Says:

    […] Game Development, CGI and Programming « Modo 10 on the move […]

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