Factory – pt 3 (early optimisation is something something)

Part 3 of https://geofflester.wordpress.com/2016/02/07/factory-pt-1/

Optimizing art early, before you have a good sense of where the actual expense of rendering your scene is, can be a pretty bad idea.

So let’s do it!!

Wut

Chill.
I’ll do it #procedurally.
Sort of.

20 gallons of evil per pixel

My ground shader is pretty expensive. It’s blending all sorts of things together, currently, and I still have things to add to it.

I don’t want to optimize the actual material yet, because it’s not done, but it looks like this and invokes shame:

WetGroundMaterial.png

As a side note here, this material network looks a bit like the Utah teapot, which is unintentionally awesome.

Every pixel on this material is calculating water and dirt blending.

But many of those pixels have no water or dirt on them:

NonBlendingAreas.png

So why pay the cost for all of that blending across the whole ground plane?
What can I do about it?

Probably use something like the built in UE4 terrain, you fool

Is probably what you were thinking.
I’m sure that UE4 does some nice optimization for areas of terrain that are using differing numbers of layers, etc.

So you’ve caught me out: The technique I’m going to show off here, I also want to use on the walls of my factory, I just haven’t built that content yet, and I thought the ground plane would be fun to test on 🙂

Back to basics

First up, I want to see exactly how much all of the fancy blending is costing.

So I made a version of the material that doesn’t do the water or the dirt, ran the level and profiled them side by side:

BlendVsNot.png

^ Simple version of my material vs the water and dirt blending one.

GPUProfile

So, you can see above that the material that has no dirt/water blending is 1.6 milliseconds cheaper.

Now, if I can put that material on the areas that don’t need the blending, I can’t expect to get that full 1.6 milliseconds back, but I might get 1 millisecond back.

That might not sound like much, but for a 60 fps game, that’s about 1/16th of the entire scene time.

Every little bit helps, getting that time back from cutting content alone can take many hours 🙂

Splitting the mesh

To put my cheap material onto the non-blending sections, I’ll split the mesh around the areas where the vertex colour masks have a value of 0.

Luckily, the ground plane is subdivided quite highly so that it plays nice with UE4 tessellation and my vertex painting, so I don’t need to do anything fancy with the mesh.

Back to Houdini we go!

PolySplit.png

So, anything that has > 0 sum vertex colour is being lifted up in this shot, just to make it obvious where the mesh split is happening.

Here’s the network:

BlendMeshSplit.png

The new nodes start at “Attribcreate”, etc.

The basic flow is:

  • “Colour value max” is set as max(@Cd.r, @Cd.g), per point, so it will be set to some value if either dirt or water are present.
  • Two new Max and Min attributes per polygon are created by promoting Colour Value max from Point –> Polygon, using Min and Max promotion methods (so if one vertex in the polygon has some dirt/water on it, the then max value will be non zero, etc)
  • The polygons are divided into three groups: Polygons that have no vertices with any blending, Polygons that have some blending, Polygons that have all verts that are 100% blending.
  • NOTE: For the purposes of this blog post, all I really care about is if the Polygon has no dirt/water or if it has some, but having the three groups described above will come in handy in a later blog post, you’ll just have to trust me 🙂
  • The two groups of polygons I care about get two different materials applied to them in Houdini.
    When I export them to UE4, they maintain the split, and I can apply my cheaper material.

So, re-exported, here it is:

BothMaterials.png
Looks the same?

Great, mission successful! Or is it…

Checking the numbers

Back to the GPU profiler!

GPUProfileReveal.png

Ok, so the column on the right is with my two materials, the column in the middle is using the expensive material across the whole ground plane.

So my saving was a bit under one millisecond in this case.
For an hour or two of work that I can re-use in lots of places, I’m willing to call that a success 🙂

Getting more back

Before cleaning up my shader, there’s a few more areas I can/might expand this, and some notes on where I expect to get more savings:

  • I’ll have smaller blending areas on my final ground plane (less water and dirt) and also on my walls. So the savings will be higher.
  • I might mask out displacement using vertex colours, so that I’m not paying for displacement across all of my ground plane and walls.
    The walls for flat sections not on the corner of the building and/or more than a few metres from the ground can go without displacement, probably.
  • The centre of the water puddles is all water: I can create a third material that just does the water stuff, and split the mesh an extra time.
    This means that the blending part of the material will be just the edges of the puddles, saving quite a lot more.

So all in all, I expect I can claw back a few more milliseconds in some cases in the final scene.

One final note, the ground plane is now three draw calls instead of one.
And I don’t care.
So there. 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Factory – pt 2 (magical placeholder land)

Part 2 of: https://geofflester.wordpress.com/2016/02/07/factory-pt-1/

FlowersInDirt

I had to split this post up, so I want to get this out of the way:
You’re going to see a lot of ugly in the post. #Procedural #Placeholder ugly 🙂

This post is mostly about early pipeline setup in Houdini Python, and UE4 c++.

Placeholder plants

For testing purposes, I made 4 instances of #procedural plants using l-systems:

UniqueFlowers

When I say “made”, I mean ripped from my Shangri-La tribute scene, just heavily modified:

https://geofflester.wordpress.com/2015/09/05/rohan-dalvi-shangri-la-themed-procedural-islands/

Like I mention in that post, if you want to learn lots about Houdini, go buy tutorials from Rohan Dalvi.
He has some free ones you can have a run through, but the floating islands series is just fantastic, so just buy it 😛

These plants I exported as FBX, imported into UE4, and gave them a flat vertex colour material, ’cause I ain’t gonna bother with unwrapping placeholder stuff:

UE4Flowers

The placeholder meshes are 4000 triangles each.
Amusingly, when I first brought them in, I hadn’t bothered checking the density, and they were 80 000 + triangles, and the frame rate was at a horrible 25 fps 😛

Houdini –> UE4

So, the 4 unique plants are in UE4. Yay!

But, I want to place thousands of them. It would be smart to use the in-built vegetation tools in UE4, but my purpose behind this post is to find some nice generic ways to get placement data from Houdini to UE4, something that I’ve been planning to do in my old Half Life scene for ages.
So I’m going to used Instanced Static Meshes 🙂

Generating the placements

For now, I’ve gone with a very simple method of placing vegetation: around the edges of my puddles.
It will do for sake of example. So here’s the puddle and vegetation masks in Houdini (vegetation mask on the left, puddle mask on the right):

PuddleAndVegeMask

A couple of layers of noise, and a fit range applied to vertex colours.

I then just scatter a bunch of points on the mask on the left, and then copy flowers onto them, creating a range of random scales and rotations:

FlowersOnMask.png

The node network for that looks like this:

PuttingPointsOnThePlane.png

Not shown here, off to the left, is all the flower setup stuff.
I’ll leave that alone for now, since I don’t know if I’ll be keeping any of that 🙂

The right hand side is the scattering, which can be summarized as:

  • Read ground plane
  • Subdivide and cache out a the super high poly plane
  • Move colour into Vertex data (because I use UVs in the next part, although I don’t really have to do it this way)
  • Read the brick texture as a mask (more on that below)
  • Move mask back to Point data
  • Scatter points on the mask
  • Add ID, Rotation and Scale data to each point
  • Flip YZ axis to match UE4 (could probably do this in Houdini prefs instead)
  • Python all the things out (more on that later)

Brick mask

I mentioned quickly that I read the brick mask as a texture in the above section.
I wanted the plants to mostly grow out of cracks, so I multiplied the mask by the inverted height of the bricks, clamped to a range, using a Point VOP:

BrickTextureOnMask.png

And here’s the network, but I won’t explain that node for node, it’s just a bunch of clamps and fits which I eyeballed until it did what I wanted:

HeightTextureVOP.png

Python all the things out, huh?

Python and I have a special relationship.
It’s my favourite language to use when there aren’t other languages available.

Anyway… I’ve gone with dumping my instance data to XML.
More on that decision later.

Now for some horrible hackyness:


node = hou.pwd()
from lxml import etree as ET

geo = node.geometry()

root = ET.Element("ObjectInstances")

for point in geo.points():
pos         = point.position()
scale       = hou.Point.attribValue(point, 'Scale')
rotation    = hou.Point.attribValue(point, 'Rotation')
scatterID   = "Flower" + repr(hou.Point.attribValue(point, 'ScatterID')+1)

PosString       = repr(pos[0]) + ", " + repr(pos[1]) + ", " + repr(pos[2])
RotString       = repr(rotation)
ScaleString     = repr(scale) + ", " + repr(scale) + ", " + repr(scale)

ET.SubElement(root, scatterID,
Location=PosString,
Rotation=RotString,
Scale=ScaleString)

# Do the export
tree = ET.ElementTree(root)
tree.write("D:/MyDocuments/Unreal Projects/Warehouse/Content/Scenes/HoudiniVegetationPlacement.xml", pretty_print=True)

NOTE: Not sure if it will post this way, but in Preview the tabbing seems to be screwed up, no matter what I do. Luckily, programming languages have block start and end syntax, so this would never be a prob… Oh. Python. Right.

Also, all hail the ugly hard coded path right at the end there 🙂
(Trust me, I’ll dump that into the interface for the node or something, would I lie to you?)

Very simply, this code exports an XML element for each Point.
I’m being very lazy for now, and only exporting Y rotation. I’ll probably fix that later.

This pumps out an XML file that looks like this:

<ObjectInstances>
<Flower1 Location=-236.48265075683594, -51.096923828125, -0.755022406578064 Rotation=(0.0, 230.97622680664062, 0.0) Scale=0.6577988862991333, 0.6577988862991333, 0.6577988862991333/>

</ObjectInstances>

Reading the XML in UE4

In the spirit of slapping things together, I decided to make a plugin that would read the XML file, and then add all the instances to my InstancedStaticMesh components.

First up, I put 4 StaticMeshActors in the scene, and in place I gave them an InstancedStaticMesh component. I could have done this in a Blueprint, but I try to keep Blueprints to a minimum if I don’t actually need them:

InstancedStaticMesh

As stated, I’m a hack, so the StaticMeshActor needs to be named Flower<1..4>, because the code matches the name to what it finds in the XML.

The magic button

I should really implement my code as a either a specialized type of Data Table, or perhaps some sort of new thing called an XMLInstancedStaticMesh, or… Something else clever.

Instead, I made a Magic Button(tm):

MagicButton

XML Object Loader. Probably should have put a cat picture on that, in retrospect.

Brief overview of code

I’m not going to post the full code here for a bunch of reasons, including just that it is pretty unexciting, but the basic outline of it is:

  1. Click the button
  2. The plugin gets all InstancedStaticMeshComponents in the scene
  3. Get a list of all of the Parent Actors for those components, and their labels
  4. Process the XML file, and for each Element:
    • Check if the element matches a name found in step 3
    • If the Actor name hasn’t already been visited, clear the instances on the InstancedStaticMesh component, and mark it as visited
    • Get the position, rotation and scale from the XML element, and add a new instance to the InstancedStaticMesh with that data

And that’s it! I had a bit of messing around, with originally doing Euler –> Quaternion conversion in Houdini instead of C++, and also not realizing that the rotations were in radians, but all in all it only took a hour or two to throw together, in the current very hacky form 🙂

Some useful snippets

The FastXML library in UE4 is great, made life easy:

https://docs.unrealengine.com/latest/INT/API/Runtime/XmlParser/FFastXml/index.html

I just needed to create a new class inheriting from the IFastXmlCallback interface, and implement the Process<x> functions.

I’d create a new instance in ProcessElement, then fill in the actual data in ProcessAttribute.

Adding an instance to an InstancedStaticMeshComponent is as easy as:


SomeStaticMeshComp->AddInstance(FTransform());

And then, in shortened form, updating the instance data:


FTransform InstanceTransform;
_currentStaticMeshComp->GetInstanceTransform(_currentInstanceID, InstanceTransform);

// ...

InstanceTransform.SetLocation(Location);
InstanceTransform.SetRotation(RotationQuaternion);
InstanceTransform.SetScale3D(Scale);

_currentStaticMeshComp->UpdateInstanceTransform(_currentInstanceID, InstanceTransform);

One last dirty detail…

That’s about it for the code side of things.

One thing I didn’t mention earlier: In Houdini, I’m using the placement of the plants to generate out the dirt map mask so I can blend in details around their roots:

DirtRootsMask.png

So when I export out my ground plane, I am putting the Puddles mask into the blue channel of the vertex colours, and the Dirt mask into the red channel of the vertex mask 🙂

Still to come (for vegetation)

So I need to:

  • Make the actual flowers I want
  • Make the roots/dirt/mossy texture that gets blended in under the plants
  • Build more stuff

Why.. O.o

Why not data tables

I’m all about XML.

But a sensible, less code-y way to do this would be to save all your instance data from Houdini into CSV format, bring it in to UE4 as a data table, then use a Construction Script in a blueprint to iterate over the data and add instances to an Instanced Static Mesh.

I like XML as a data format, so I decided it would be more fun to use XML.

Why not Houdini Engine

That’s a good question…

In short:

  • I want to explore similar workflows with Modo replicators at some point, and I should be able to re-use the c++/Python stuff for that
  • Who knows what other DCC tools I’ll want to export instances out of
  • It’s nice to jump into code every now and then. Keeps me honest.
  • I don’t own it currently, and I’ve spent my software budget on Houdini Indie and Modo 901 already 🙂

If you have any questions, feel free to dump them in the comments, I hurried through this one a little since it’s at a half way point without great results to show off yet!

 

 

Factory – pt 1

This blog post won’t mostly be about a factory, but if I title it this way, it might encourage me to finish something at home for a change 😉

My wife had a great idea that I should re-make some of my older art assets, so I’m going to have a crack at this one, that I made for Heroes Over Europe, 8 years ago:

Factory

I was quite happy with this, back in the day. I’d had quite a lot of misses with texturing on that project. The jump from 32*32 texture sheets on a PS2 flight game to 512*512 texture sets was something that took a lot of adjusting to.

I was pretty happy with the amount of detail I managed to squeeze out of a single 512 set for this guy, although I had to do some fairly creative unwrapping to make it happen, so it wasn’t a very optimal asset for rendering!

The plan

I want to make a UE4 scene set at the base of a similar building.
The main technical goal is to learn to use Substance Painter better, and to finally get back to doing some environment art.

Paving the way in Houdini

First up, I wanted to have a go at making a tiling brick material in Substance Painter.
I’ve used it a bit on and off, in game jams, etc, but haven’t had much chance to dig into it.

Now… This is where a sensible artist would jump into a tool like ZBrush, and throw together a tiling high poly mesh.

But, in order to score decently on Technical Director Buzz Word Bingo, I needed to be able to say the word Procedural at least a dozen more times this week, so…

HoudiniBricks

I made bricks #Procedurally in Houdini, huzzah!

I was originally planning to use Substance Designer, which I’ve been playing around with on and off since Splinter Cell: Blacklist, but I didn’t want to take the time to learn it properly right now. The next plan was Modo replicators (which are awesome), but I ran into a few issues with displacement.

Making bricks

Here is the network for making my brick variations, and I’ll explain a few of the less obvious bits of it:

BricksNetwork

It a little lame, but my brick is a subdivided block with some noise on it:

Brick.jpg

I didn’t want to wait for ages for every brick to have unique noise, so the “UniqueBrickCopy” node creates 8 unique IDs, which are passed into my Noise Attribute VOP, and used to offset the position for two of the noise nodes I’m using on vertex position, as you can see bottom left here:

NoiseVOP.jpg

So that the repetition isn’t obvious, I randomly flip the Y and Z of the brick, so even if you get the same brick twice in a row, there’s less chance of a repeat (that’s what the random_y_180 and random_z_180 nodes are at the start of this section).

Under those flipping nodes, there are some other nodes for random rotations, scale and transform to give some variation.

Randomness

Each position in my larger tiling pattern has a unique ID, so that I can apply the same ID to two different brick placements, and know that I’m going to have the exact same brick (to make sure it tiles when I bake it out).

You can see the unique IDs as the random colours in the first shot of the bricks back up near the top.

You might notice (if you squint) that the top two and bottom two rows, and left two and 2nd and 3rd from the right rows have matching random colours.

Placing the bricks in a pattern

There was a fair bit of manual back and forth to get this working, so it’s not very re-usable, but I created two offset grids, copied a brick onto each point of the grid, and played around with brick scale and grid offsets until the pattern worked.

BrickPointsNetwork.jpg

So each grid creates an “orientation” attribute, which is what rotates the bricks for the alternating rows. I merge the points together, sort them along the X and Y axis (so the the vertex numbers go up across rows).

Now, the only interesting bit here is creating the unique instance ID I mentioned before.
Since I’ve sorted the vertices, I set the ID to be the vertex ID, but I want to make sure that the last two columns and the last two rows match with the first and last columns and rows.

This is where the two wrangle nodes come in: they just check if the vertex is in the last two columns, and if it is, set the ID to be back at the start of the row.

So then we have this (sorry, bit hard to read, but pretend that the point IDs on the right match those on the left):

PointIDs.jpg

And yes, in case you are wondering, this is a lot of effort for something that could be easier done in ZBrush.
I’m not in the habit of forcing things down slow procedural paths when there is no benefit in doing so, but in this case: kittens!
(I’ve got to break my own rules sometimes for the sake of fun at home :))

Painter time

Great, all of that ugly #Procedural(tm) stuff out of the way, now on to Substance Painter!

PainterBase.jpg

So I’ve brought in the high poly from Houdini, and baked it out onto a mesh, and this is my starting point.
I’m not going to break down everything I’ve done in Substance, but here are the layers:

TextureLayers.gif

All of the layers are #Procedural(tm), using the inbuilt masks and generators in Painter, which use the curvature, ambient occlusion and thickness maps that Painter generates from your high poly mesh.

The only layer that had any manual input was the black patches, because I manually picked a bunch of IDs from my Houdini ID texture bake, to get a nice distribution:

IDPicking.jpg

The only reason I picked so many manually is that Painter seems to have some issues with edge pixels in a Surface ID map, so I had to try and not pick edge bricks.
Otherwise, I could have picked a lot less, and ramped the tolerance up more.

You might notice that the material is a little dark. I still haven’t nailed getting my UE4 lighting setup to match with Substance, so that’s something I need to work on.
Luckily, it’s pretty easy to go back and lighten it up without losing any quality 🙂

Testing in UE4

UE4Plane.jpg

Pretty happy with that, should look ok with some mesh variation, concrete skirting, etc!
I’ll still need to spend more time balancing brightness, etc.

For giggles, I brought in my wet material shader from this scene:

https://geofflester.wordpress.com/2015/03/22/rising-damp/

UE4PlaneWater.jpg

Not sure if I’ll be having a wet scene or not yet, but it does add some variation, so I might keep it 🙂

Oh, and in case you were wondering how I generated the vertex colour mask for the water puddles… #Procedural(tm)!

HoudiniPuddles.jpg

Exported out of Houdini, a bunch of noise, etc. You get the idea 🙂

Next up

Think I’ll do some vegetation scattering on the puddle plane in Houdini, bake out the distribution to vertex colours, and use it to drive some material stuff in UE4 (moss/dirt under the plants, etc).

And probably export the plants out as a few different unique models, and their positions to something that UE4 can read.

That’s the current plan, anyway 🙂

 

Rohan Dalvi + Shangri-La themed procedural islands

FloatingIslandsShangriLa

Over the last month or two, I’ve been working through a fantastic set of Houdini tutorials by Rohan Dalvi:

Rohan Dalvi Tutorials

They reminded me quite a lot of the floating islands in FarCry 4 Shangri-La (which I was lucky enough to work on, which I briefly mentioned here), so for a bit of fun I went with a “Shangri-La” theme.

I changed up quite a few things along the way, but the result is not far removed from a palette swap on original tutorials.
So please, check out the tutorials if you want to know how it’s done, it’s a mostly procedural workflow 🙂

More Shangri-La stuff

If you want to see some more of the concept for Shangri-La, you should check out Kay Huang’s portfolio here:

http://www.kayinkspot.com/porfolio.html

Here’s our art director Josh Cook chatting about how we ended up where we did, and the intention behind the art of Shangri-La:

http://www.polygon.com/features/2015/3/16/8219481/shangri-la-far-cry-4-artwork-gallery-gdc-2015

Also, Jobye-Kyle Karmaker shared some insight into his level art process on the floating islands section of Shangri-La, and the reveal leading up to it:

http://jobyek.blogspot.ca/2015/08/welcome.html

Just a very small sample of the amazing art team we had on that project 🙂